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About EMRA

EMRA was founded with an interim board in June 2012, in Lund, Sweden.

It became a legal, non profit entity in November 2012, and opened to members and elected a board of management during ECEM 2013 in Lund, Sweden.

As of the first general assembley on Sunday Aug 11th 2013, EMRA has 197 researcher and three industrial members. 

The main current activities of EMRA are:

 

1. Development of standards for eye tracker data quality 

EMRA administers and leads the joint EMRA and COGAIN eye data quality standardisation (EDQ) project. While results as they relate to gaze interaction are the main contribution of COGAIN to the work, the project is mainly concerned with eye data quality in research - independent and standardised measurement and comparison of commercial systems, investigation of the effects of eye data quality characteristics (e.g. spatial accuracy and spatial and temporal precision, in various forms and from various calculations) on the measurement of eye movement `events' - fixations, saccades, microsaccades etc., and in improving the validity of eye movement measures from existing hardware.

2. Development and sharing of open source tools for eye movement research

Through the EMRA Student software competition at ECEM 2013 and ECEM 2015, and the joint EMRA-COGAIN workshops prior to ECEM 2013, and EMRA workshops at ETRA 2016, we are developing a library of research and teaching tools. We are also developing a library of shared tools as an output of the EDQ project - including the ioHub now part of the general psychopy release authored by Sol Simpson, and several other generally useful software.

3. Support for teaching and training for eye movement research

EMRA members provided workshops prior to ECEM 2013 (organised by Markus Nystrom, Dan Witzner Hansen and Fiona Mulvey), and an EDQ workshop for ETRA 2015, ETRA 2016, and is available to support and/give tutorials at eye tracking related conferences in the future. See our news ticker on the homepage for notifications of upcoming EMRA courses and workshops.

Apart from these main activities, we are also building a museum of eyetracking which will include some archival material from early ECEM conferences, researcher's own personal photos and records, and other donated material which is of importance to the research community and the development of the field over the last several decades. We also support the Journal of Eye Movement Research (JEMR). For a full picture of our activities, see `Mission statement' on the menu left.

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